[p4] New perforce depot restructuring scripts in my public

Jeff Grills jgrills at drivensnow.org
Thu Jul 20 10:03:24 PDT 2006


I've written a couple of new perl scripts that I just submitted to my public
perforce directory.  These scripts are designed to make restructuring files
in your server easier by allowing you to use your standard file manipulation
tools to move things around until you're happy with the result.  The files
are located here:
 
//guest/jeff_grills/restructure/restructure_start.pl
//guest/jeff_grills/restructure/restructure_finish.pl
 
When you run the restructure_start.pl script, it grabs the list of files on
your client using "p4 files //...#have", so it depends upon your client
mapping and what you have sync'd/flush'd to your client.  It will use that
information to create the entire hierarchy of directories and files in your
current directory, but instead of each file having its normal contents, it
instead has the depot name of the file which was used to create that file.
 
As mentioned above, you then use whatever tools you want (Windows Explorer,
etc) to move those files around until you're happy with the final structure.
You can move files, duplicate files, and delete files.
 
Then, you run the restructure_finish.pl script.  This script will scan the
modified directory tree, and for every file it finds, it will look inside
that file to determine where it came from.  If the original depot location
is not the same as the current file location, the program will emit a "p4
integrate source destination" command to standard output to integrate from
the old location to the current location.  After that, the script will issue
another "p4 files //...#have" command and look for each of those files in
the new directory tree; if it does not find them, it will emit a "p4 delete
file" command to standard out to remove that file.
 
I'd suggest capturing the output from the restructure_finish to a file, and
then making a pass over that file to check for correctness.  Once you're
satisfied, you can execute all the command in that file (in Windows, you can
name the file with a .bat extension and execute it; in unix, you can source
the file into your current shell, or execute it as a shell script).  Again,
you should check the final result for correctness before submitting.
 
I hope this helps someone else out.  It sure made restructuring some files a
lot easier for me.
 
j
 



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